The Anatomy of a Bike: Identifying the Parts

A bicycle is the sum of all its parts — headset, crank, cluster, and many others. But what are these parts, where do you find them? Tamia dissects a bike to identify the most commonly referenced anatomical features. Don’t worry, though, the demo isn’t gross.
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Bicycle Maintenance Article on Tamiasoutside.com

by Tamia Nelson | May 24, 2018
Originally published in different form on June 19, 2017

Do you know what’s meant by a bike’s headset? Or the rear dropout? Or the chainstay? You might not if you’re new to cycling. Or if you’ve been riding bikes for awhile but never gave thought to more than the pedals, saddle, and tire pressures. Yet if your bike develops a strange knock, or the steering seems wonky for no reason, or the brakes aren’t functioning properly, than you’ll have an easier time diagnosing the problem if you know how to identify the bike’s constituent parts. This is doubly true if you are thinking of learning to service and repair your bike.

Even simple bicycles are built of many parts. The frame is obvious, … Continue reading »

Wet-Weather Advice: Pitching a Dry Camp in the Rain

Into everybody’s life a little rain must fall, and while rain helps hydrate the land and prevent drought, it also can put a damper on your camping trip. This doesn’t have to be the case. Camping in the rain can be a pleasure, but to make that happen, you’ll need to be prepared, and you’ll have to know how to pitch a dry camp when rain is falling. Tamia explains how to make it happen.
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by Tamia Nelson | May 20, 2018

Camping Article on Tamiasoutside.com

Rain has fallen at least some of the time on most of my multi-day trips by bike, boat, and on foot, but being prepared prevented those trips from being washouts. In truth I rather enjoy the experience. A day or more in a wet camp doesn’t have to be a prison sentence. Instead, it can be a time to relax and live life in the slow lane. The success or failure of a rainy camp comes down to a number of factors, though. And top of the list is to…

Keep Your Continue reading »

The Art of the Miniature Adventure: How To Get Away From It All…

Overworked? Run-down? Need a holiday? But you can only spare a couple of days—or maybe just an afternoon? You don’t have to settle for binge-watching Peaky Blinders. You can get away from it all and still be back on Monday, and this week Farwell tells you how. It’s the first of a three-part exploration of the art of the “Miniature Adventure.”
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by Farwell Forrest | May 15, 2018
Originally published in different form on May 24, 2005
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There were four of us—George, and William Samuel Harris, and myself, and Montmorency. We were sitting in my room, smoking, and talking about how bad we were—bad from a medical point of view I mean, of course.

We were all feeling seedy, and we were getting quite nervous about it. … What it was that was actually the matter with us, we none of us could be sure of; but the unanimous opinion was that it—whatever it was—had been brought on by overwork.

“What we want is rest,” said Harris.

“Rest and a complete change,” said George. …

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The Maternal Line: Eulogy for a Beautiful Woman

A father. His daughter. His daughter’s daughter. A river. No, that’s not right. The River. Theirs is a story that began long ago. But it hasn’t ended yet. And The River flows through it.
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by Tamia Nelson | May 10, 2018
Originally published in different form in different places in other years.

Absent Friends Article on Tamiasoutside.com

The girl found The River irresistible. Whenever she could, she scrambled over the cliff that rose precipitously from the swift waters. The snowmelt‑swollen spring torrents carved deep potholes in the cliff’s sheer walls, and when the floods receded, the girl sometimes found stranded trout in those dark recesses, swimming frantically in futile circles. That’s when she taught herself how to tickle trout, catching the imprisoned fish in her hands before returning them to The River. It was a difficult job, even a dangerous one at times, but seeing the trout swim free was all the reward that she asked — or wanted.

When she wasn’t climbing the cliff, the girl often dabbled in The River’s shallows, turning over cobbles to see who might be living under them. … Continue reading »